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Dehydrated Black Soldier Fly Larvae

  • Dried all-natural high calcium BSFL
Price:
$13.50
Current Stock:
79


Product Description

Dehydrated Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Free Shipping - arrives in 2 to 5 days

These are dehydrated and not live BSFL!

 

 

Roast dried BSFL are 100% natural 

Though they are dehydrated they are still packed with natural oils, protein and vitamins and of course the highest levels calcium of any feeder insect.

Wild birds, sugar gliders, fish, reptiles and chickens eat dried BSFL.  These are perfect when you can't store live worms, or conditions are too hot/cold for shipping them.

BSFL contain amino acids lysine and methionine that suppress bacterial and fungal infections. They also contain omega 6 and 9 fatty acids.

 

Q & A

 

Q:  What's the best way to store them?

A:  It is very important that dried BSFL are stored properly to ensure long term freshness. Storing them in a cupboard which is warm or humid will diminish shelf life.

Our first recommendation is freezing or storing in a refrigerator or freezer: Place the dried BSFL in a clean, tight-sealing freezer bag. Maximum cold storage is recommended because heat and moisture are the greatest enemies. The worms should keep well for up to a year.

If you must store them in a cabinet, make sure that the cabinet is both dark and cool. Place the worms into either a plastic or glass container with a tight-fitting lid. They will last up to 6 months with no degradation.

 

Q.  Can I rehydrate them?

To rehydrate them, we've found the best method is a long soak in cold water for 4 to 8 hours (or overnight). You can also use hot or boiling water for a much faster 30-minute soak, but the hot water tends to break them up a bit more. 

Put the worms in a container, add water and stir them will to separate them. You'll know that they are done when they have swollen up, softened, and turned pale in color. 

If you're feeding wild birds, using nectar to rehydrate them increases the flavor, and attracts more birds.

 


Q&A



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